Joe Mixon accepts responsibility for actions in 2014 incident, finally

joemixon

Oklahoma star running back Joe Mixon stepped in front of the media for only the second time during his career as a Sooner to discuss the 2014 incident where he violently struck a female student.

Mixon was able to remain on the team thanks to a light punishment from head coach Bob Stoops, but he has now addressed what he learned from the incident.

During his media with the media on Friday, Mixon publicly apologized for his role in the incident and accepted full responsibility.

“I’m here to basically apologize to Miss Molitor, apologize to Coach Stoops, apologize to David Boren, my teammates and family,” Mixon stated, via Sooner Scoop.  “It’s never, never okay to retaliate and hit a woman the way I did.

“If I could go back, I would do whatever I could to change the outcome of that situation. Definitely would have walked or ran away. It really don’t matter what she did that night. It’s all on me… I take full responsibility on what happened that night. Everyday I gotta live with it, gotta sleep with it. It haunts me to this day. If I could take it all back I would.”

As for what he learned from his poor decision to violently react to Molitor, Mixon added, “Honestly, I’m not worried about the NFL. I’m totally right now committed to the team. I haven’t made a decision.”

Mixon is saying all of the right things at this time as he attempts to rehabilitate his image, but actions speak louder than words.

It will be interesting to see what Mixon’s next move will be now that the video has become public record, but it’s clear that he still has a long way to go before NFL teams and front-offices will have full trust in his decision making and maturity.

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Josh SanchezCAMPUSSPORTS Writer
Josh studied journalism at Seton Hill University. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Campus Sports. Josh is currently a member of the FWAA and USBWA. His work has been featured on Sports Illustrated, ESPN.com, FOXSports.com, CBSSports.com and many others.
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