4-star 2016 center Schnider Herard trims list to five

Class of 2016 four-star center Schnider Herard, out of Texas’s Prestonwood Christian Academy, near Dallas, has trimmed his list of possible schools down to five. Herard announced the development on his personal Twitter page.

All five schools are ones at which Herard could definitely make an immediate impact, especially given how he has excellent size at 6-foot-10, 240 pounds. Purdue will lose senior seven-footer A.J. Hammons after this season and assuming that five-star freshman big man Caleb Swanigan stays on for the 2016-17 campaign, adding Herard could make for a dangerous frontcourt.

In the case of Kansas, the Jayhawks are about to lose a lot of seniors in the frontcourt, so adding Herard there could make for a smoother transition. If five-star freshman Cheick Diallo is cleared to play and decides to stay on for next year, all the better.

Cal is turning into a fine program again under coach Cuonzo Martin and may need help if freshman Ivan Rabb opts to declare for the draft after the upcoming season, Mississippi State has strong recruiter Ben Howland to try and lure Herard to Starkville as the Bulldogs try to get back to the NCAA Tournament, but the wild card on this list is Texas Tech.

Led by former Kentucky and Minnesota coach Tubby Smith, the Red Raiders have gone just 27-37 (9-17 Big 12) in two years under him and have not been to the big dance since 2007. In a nutshell, it seems that the university is banking on Smith’s name to draw recruits to the program so that it may rise from the ashes. By landing a local talent in Herard, that would help Texas Tech take one giant step forward.

Either way, Herard’s recruitment is officially one to watch and Campus Sports will update his process as new information becomes available.

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*Featured Photo (above) credit to Inside the Hall

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