Oliver Luck, the NCAA's executive vice president for regulatory affairs, commented on why coaches are paid in college football, but not players.

Oliver Luck comments on why coaches, not players are paid

Oliver Luck, the NCAA’s executive vice president of regulatory affairs, explained his viewpoint on why players should not be paid at the college football level. He also explained why coaches should be paid, but not players.

His original statement shook up the nation and angered many.

NCAA's Oliver Luck on why there's an open market for coaches pay and not athletes: Coaches are adults.

— Michael Casagrande (@ByCasagrande) December 10, 2015

There has been a heated debate going on about why players should or should not be paid and it has gotten to a nearly ridiculous point. Here is Luck’s comeback on what he meant to say.

“I probably misspoke some,” Luck told AL.com. “It doesn’t have to do with age, necessarily. When you’re 18, you are an adult. There are certain things you’re not allowed to do. But by in large, you can do other things in life. It’s more about the relationship that historically existed on campuses and that relationship that university has with a coach or a professor or staff person is different than it has been with a student. I think if we change that relationship, we’ll have lost our way because traditionally, that’s the way.I may have put too much emphasis on the adult vs. an 18-year old because they’re both adults technically. Although there are some limitations on what 18- or 19- year or 20-year old can do.”

Those comments are much more clear about what Luck really feels on the subject and, quite frankly, they make a lot of sense.

Luck is 100 percent right that a coach is living off of the job that he has coaching the players. He does that and pours his time, heart and soul into the program. The players, on the other hand, are at the school to play football while also getting an education that everyone else around them has to pay for.

Could the NCAA come up with ways to compromise with the players without actually paying them? Absolutely. One way to do that would be allowing players to sell autographs if they work hard enough to get to that point where fans would be willing to pay for them.

All of that being said, we have not heard the last of this situation and it will get worse before it gets better. We’d love to hear more from you guys about your thoughts on the subject in the comment box below.

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*Featured Photo (above) credit to USA TODAY Sports