Nebraska football: Regent calls for dismissal of 3 players who protested during anthem

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Last weekend, the Nebraska football program advanced to 4-0 on the season and earned the nation’s No. 15 ranking. However, it was a statement from three players before the game that really has been generating a lot of buzz.

Three members of the team — linebacker Michael Rose-Ivey, defensive end DaiShon Neal and linebacker Mohamed Barry — took a knee during the national anthem, joining the growing protest for social equality that was started by San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Since taking the knee, the players have received horrible messages on social media and even death threats, and now they have a man calling for their heads.

Hal Daub, a Nebraska regent who previous served as the mayor of Omaha and sat in the United States House of Representatives, says that the players who kneeled during the anthem should be kicked off of the team.

“It’s a free country. They don’t have to play football for the university either,” Daub told the Lincoln Journal-Star.

“They know better, and they had better be kicked off the team. They won’t take the risk to exhibit their free speech in a way that places their circumstance in jeopardy, so let them get out of uniform and do their protesting on somebody else’s nickel.”

Talk about a tone deaf response. Good grief, Hal.

Luckily, Nebraska head coach Mike Reilly has a good head on his shoulders and expressed an incredible understanding over his players’ decision to kneel so it’s unlikely the players will face any punishment. And they shouldn’t.

Nebraska looks to move past Daub’s asinine comments while advancing to 5-0 when the Cornhuskers host Illinois on Saturday.

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CAMPUSSPORTS Writer
CAMPUSSPORTS Writer
Josh studied journalism at Seton Hill University. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Campus Sports. Josh is currently a member of the FWAA and USBWA. His work has been featured on Sports Illustrated, ESPN.com, FOXSports.com, CBSSports.com and many others.
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