Cal Poly Gets Hammered With NCAA Violations

The NCAA continues to be the villain of the collegiate world. Most recently the NCAA has hammered on down on the Cal Poly Mustangs basketball program for their recent compensation violations.

Cal Poly has been accused of giving it athletes to much money to pay for their textbooks. The NCAA has a strict no compensation policy and enforces it heavily. Cal Poly has violated the NCAA’s policy.

You can find the full report here.

In the report, the NCAA states, “For a period of three-and-one half years, Cal Poly violated book-related financial aid legislation. Specifically, from the 2012-13 academic year through the 2015 fall quarter, Cal Poly provided 265 student-athletes impermissible financial aid in the form of $800 cash stipends for books and course-related supplies that was not equal to the actual cost of those items, as required by NCAA legislation. The institution mistakenly believed it could provide the book stipends in the same manner it provided room and board stipends. Some student-athletes used portions of these funds to pay for items that were not required course-related books and supplies and, in doing so, received impermissible benefits.”

However, this report might not be as serious as stated.

Per Deadspin, “Cal Poly self-reported the slight overages in funding, and the NCAA’s panel found that it was clearly not intentional.” Even with Cal Poly fully cooperating with the NCAA, the NCAA still plans to enforce repercussions for the Mustangs basketball program. But it is ethically correct?

“Only 72 of the 265 students received more money than needed for school supplies.” Even then the surplus of money given out still went to the necessities of the students. It was reported that the money was used for “food, rent, utilities, and car repairs.” Nothing insanely over the top.

Unfortunately, the NCAA still plans on punishing Cal Poly. The Mustangs can face an array of punishments. Repercussions can include a two-year program probation which would also make them ineligible for the NCAA playoffs, or “a $5,000 fine, as well as the vacating of games, possibly including the only March Madness appearance in school history.”