Former Texas Longhorns head coach Mack Brown was uninterested in the SMU head coaching vacancy.

Mack Brown Doesn’t Want SMU Head Coaching Job

Texas Longhorns coaching legend Mack Brown was recently contacted by another Texas program about filling a sideline vacancy. The Mustangs have been looking to fill their coaching void for some time and Brown’s name surfaced as a potential suitor.

Longhorns booster Joe Jamail broke the news. Jamail also said that Brown had been offered several jobs prior to SMU.

“He was approached, I was approached, but he’s not interested in coaching anywhere right now,” Jamail said. “He likes what he’s doing. He misses it, frankly, but he loves being on ESPN.”

Brown, 63, has spent the last year working as a college football analyst at ESPN, and is very happy with his current professional status.

Reporters pressed Brown who dismissed any rumors that have been swirling.

“I will not make any decisions about my future until December, after I talk with my bosses at ESPN and see if they’re happy with me, and then when I can evaluate my first year on television,” Brown said.

Brown spent 15 years at the Texas helm and won an outstanding 158 games to complement 48 losses.  He was also among college football’s highest paid coaches earning $5.4 million per season.  The highlight of Brown’s career was winning the 2005 BCS Title game over the USC Trojans. Vince Young, who was a Heisman runner-up to Trojan tailback Reggie Bush, pushed the Longhorns ahead on a game winning touchdown with less than a minute remaining.

Brown also fell in the 2010 title game to Nick Saban’s Alabama Crimson Tide, a loss that many people cited as the downfall in his career. Since that loss, injuries depleted the Longhorns and Brown struggled to revive his ailing program before resigning last winter and making way for Charlie Strong. Brown’s ability to coach remains unquestioned, but it doesn’t appear we’ll get the chance to see him on the sidelines anytime soon.

*Section Photo credit to Bob Levey, Getty Images; Featured Photo (above) credit to Brendan Maloney, USA Today Sports