David Irving Quits NFL Because Of Weed Policy

Dallas Cowboys defensive tackle David Irving made headlines last night with his obscure public departure from the NFL. Irving took to Instagram to announce that he is resigning from professional football. This comes at a time where the NFL indefinitely suspended Irving last week for violating their drug policy. During the 17 minute live stream, Irving started off short and sweet.

“Basically, guys, I quit. I’m out of there. I’m not doing this s–t no more. You know, it’s a lot of reasons why, you know, I’ve come to this decision, but y’all know how it is. It’s a lot of f—ked s–t. Um, it’s a lot of s–t f–ked up with the NFL.”

Irving’s informal resignation can be found on his Instagram.

However, the New York Post also provided a recording of the incident.

During the entirety of his rant, Irving was spotted smoking of what seemed to be a blunt. Irving reinforced the speculation when he stated: “Pass the blunt, bro.” But the Iowa State Alum made clear that his choice was not solely based upon his love of weed. It seemed that the NFL’s drug policy went against the defensive tackles ethical beliefs.

“But yeah, I’m all right, this is my choice,” Irving continued. “I’m living with it. I’m not about to be forced into doing something. I’m not playing for free … I don’t think I’m a bad guy for choosing this route. You know, I stand up for what I believe in.”

Irving’s protest against the NFL is proving to be very costly for the 25-year-old.

The Dallas Morning News reported that the Cowboys have no intention of retaining Irving during the offseason. Irving has given the Cowboys four years of his talents but only played in two game this past season due to injury.

Irving can argue all he wants that his departure from the league isn’t related to his love of weed. However, during the chat with his 141,000 Instagram followers, Irving couldn’t stop himself from tackling the issue of his weed addiction.

“Weed … you’re addicted to this, and that. I mean, s–t, if I’m going to be addicted to something, I’d rather it be marijuana, which is medical. It’s medicine; I do not consider it a drug, rather than the Xanax bars or the hydros or the Seroquel and all that crazy s–t that they feed you,” he said.

Irving continued to compare the league’s policy to other professionals organizations. “How many NBA players you see getting in trouble about this? How many coaches you see get in trouble about this? How many baseball players get in trouble? How many UFC players getting in trouble? How many actors? Not many, but you do see us football players.”

Irving’s abrupt departure seems to stem from his built up frustration with the league. However, with many states still not allowing the use of marijuana, it seems the NFL is obligated to enforce rules against the use of it. But, with an increase in public displeasure for the NFL’s policy, the league may be pressured to lighten the repercussions for weed-related incidents.