WATCH: Sports Gambler Smashes Single-Game Jeopardy Record

Jeopardy is a game show that has been going on since 1965. The show has gone through multiple changes over the years, but no change was as big as James Holzhauer’s single-game winnings record. The 34-year old professional sports gambler won $110,914 on April 9.

The previous record for a single-game was $77,000 in 2010 by Roger Craig (not the San Francisco 49ers running back). Holzhauer put $38,314 on the Final Jeopardy question for his total to eclipse $100,000. The professional sports gambler had already earned $72,614 before correctly answering the last question.

Holzhauer’s run on April 9 was aided by three Daily Doubles in the game. His combined bets of $40,600 helped elevate him from the other two contestants. The professional sports gambler used his professional expertise to swing the momentum in his favor. Holzhauer’s second Daily Double came with him having $14,600 and he decided to go all-in. The decision could have proven to be dangerous as the 34-year old could have lost all his winnings from the game. Holzhauer was smart with his decision as he turned his winnings from $14,600 to $29,200.

His final Daily Double was worth $25,000, which put him at over $70,000 for the game. Holzhauer’s strategy of betting worked to perfection, but he also had the advantage of the Daily Double. Holzhauer was able to win that much money because he got all three of the game’s Daily Doubles.

James just broke the single-game winnings record with a total of $110,914! pic.twitter.com/tVkOlivPY5

— Jeopardy! (@Jeopardy) April 10, 2019

Ken Jennings set the record for the most consecutive Jeopardy wins with 74, but he never received all three Daily Doubles in one show. Holzhauer’s overall winnings through four games have been staggering as he has won $244,365. That is an average winnings of $61,091.25 per game.

The Las Vegas native had already won $133,451 in his previous three games, but he substantially added to his total after April 9. Holzhauer has a long way to go to equal Jennings’ mark of 74, but anything is possible after winning over $100,000 in a single game.