The 10 Best College Football Stadiums In The Country

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College football games bring an energy and excitement that elevates the product to new levels. Each and every weekend, we see college football fans packing their home stadium to root on their school regardless of how successful the program has been.

All across the country there are crowds bigger than any NFL stadium could hold and the home-field advantage often proves to be a deciding factor.

But while every team has their loyal fan base, there are a handful of programs that differentiate themselves with their high-quality facilities and unrivaled atmospheres.

What are some of the top college football stadiums in the nation? Let’s take a look.


10. Clemson — Memorial Stadium

Known as Death Valley by Clemson fans everywhere, Memorial Stadium is a beautiful stadium that has been around since September 19, 1942. Clemson has two incredible traditions at Memorial Stadium, running down the hill and Howard’s Rock. Howard’s Rock has been vandalized twice, leading to the Clemson Ranger Club protecting the rock for 24 hours prior to the Tigers’ rivalry game with South Carolina. Running Down The Hill is used to intimidate opponents as players run down the hill on their way from the field house to the stadium.

The tradition sets Memorial Stadium apart from the team’s foes in the ACC.

Capacity

81,500

Attendance Record

86,092

Location

Clemson, South Carolina

Nickname

Death Valley

Date Opened

October 6, 1941

Home Teams

Clemson Tigers, Carolina Panthers (1995)


9. Tennessee — Neyland Stadium

Neyland Stadium originally opened in 1921 with just 3,200 seats, but after countless renovations, the stadium is now capable of holding more than 100,000 rowdy fans. It is the fifth largest stadium in the United States, named after former Vols head coach Robert Neyland. You can always tell you are watching a Tennessee football game thanks to the orange-and-white checkerboard endzones.

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Capacity

102,455

Attendance Record

109,061

Location

Knoxville, Tennessee

Nickname

N/A

Date Opened

September 24, 1921

Home Teams

Tennessee Volunteers football


8. Texas A&M — Kyle Field

Home of the 12th Man, Kyle Field is the largest stadium in the SEC and the fourth largest in the United States. The stadium has been home to Texas A&M football since 1904. The Bernard C. Richardson Zone is one of the newer features at the stadium, hosting the nation’s only all-sports museum funded primarily by former athletes and showcasing the history of the program. You can also visit Reveille Cemetary, which is home to past mascots.

Capacity

102,733

Attendance Record

110,631

Location

College Stadium, Texas

Nickname

Home of the 12th Man

Date Opened

September 24, 1927

Home Teams

Texas A&M Aggies football


7. Georgia — Sanford Stadium

Samford Stadium has undergone multiple expansions throughout the years, leading to the current capacity of 92,746. The stadium features a beautiful view of the Georgia campus and is known as “Between the Hedges” thanks to the field being surrounded by privet hedges. It is the 11th largest stadium in the United States and previously hosted soccer matches during the 1996 Summer Olympics. Like Kyle Field, there is a section for deceased mascots that are entombed in the corner of the stadium.

Capacity

92,746

Attendance Record

N/A

Location

Athens, Georgia

Nickname

Between the Hedges

Date Opened

October 12, 1929

Home Teams

Georgia Bulldogs, 1998 Summer Olympics (football)


6. UCLA — Rose Bowl

Perhaps one of the most recognizable stadium in college football, the Rose Bowl is recognized as a National Historic Landmark and a California Historic Civil Engineering landmark. Along with being home to the UCLA Bruins, the Rose Bowl has hosted five Super Bowls, the 1994 FIFA World Cup Final, 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final, and 1984 Olympic Gold Medal match.

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Capacity

90,888

Attendance Record

106,869

Location

Pasadena, California

Nickname

America’s Stadium

Date Opened

October 28, 1922

Home Teams

Rose Bowl Game, UCLA Bruins football, Los Angeles Galaxy (MLS) (1996–2002), Pasadena Bowl (1946–1966, 1969–1971), Caltech Beavers (1923–1976), Pasadena HS Bulldogs, John Muir HS Mustangs, CSULA Diablos (1957–1960, 1963–1969), Los Angeles Wolves (1968), and Los Angeles Aztecs (1978–1979)


5. Ohio State — Ohio Stadium

The Ohio State Buckeyes have one of the most loyal fanbases in the nation, making the atmosphere at Ohio Stadium a memorable one. With a capacity of 104,944, it is the third largest football stadium in the United States and the fourth largest non-racing stadium in the world. Ohio Stadium is listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service. Along with hosting the Buckeyes football games, Ohio Stadium is the site of spring commencement ceremonies for the university.


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Capacity

104,944

Attendance Record

110,045

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Nickname

The Horseshoe, The Shoe, The House That Harley Built

Date Opened

October 7, 1922

Home Teams

Ohio State Buckeyes football, Ohio Glory (1992), Columbus Crew SC (1996-1998)


4. Notre Dame — Notre Dame Stadium

Notre Dame Stadium has been around for 87 years and can hold up to 77,622 fans. There is also a unique experience from the seats of the stadium, with “Touchdown Jesus,” a mural by Millard Sheets titled “The Word of Life,” visible throughout. The mural was gifted to Notre Dame from Mr. and Mrs. Howard V. Phalin.

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New.

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Notre Dame Stadium, ND v USC, 10-21-2017

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Capacity

77,622

Attendance Record

80,795

Location

Notre Dame, Indiana

Nickname

The House That Rockne Built

Date Opened

October 4, 1930

Home Teams

Notre Dame Fighting Irish football


3. Michigan — Michigan Stadium

“The Big House” is one of the most iconic stadiums in the country. With the ability to hold 107,601 fans, Michigan Stadium is the largest stadium in the country and the second biggest in the world. Some of the seats in the stadium are below ground level, so you can’t always recognize the size of the stadium from outside, but the atmosphere is virtually unmatched. Along with being home of the Wolverines football team, the men’s and women’s lacrosse teams play their home games on the field.

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Capacity

107,601

Attendance Record

115,109

Location

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Nickname

The Big House

Date Opened

October 1, 1927

Home Teams

Michigan Wolverines football, Michigan Wolverines men’s lacrosse, Michigan Wolverines women’s lacrosse, Michigan Wolverines field hockey (1973-1975)


2. Penn State — Beaver Stadium

The second-biggest stadium in the country, Beaver Stadium routinely fills with more than 100,000 fans on gamedays. When theNNittany Lions hold a White Out game, it creates one of the best sights in the game. The stadium is named after former Pennsylvania governor James A. Beaver, who is president of the university’s board of trustees. It is the third largest stadium in the world. At Beaver Stadium, you will see the iconic “S-Zone” student section and experience some of the best tailgating leading up to kickoff.

Capacity

106,572

Attendance Record

110,823

Location

State College, Pennsylvania

Nickname

N/A

Date Opened

September 17, 1960

Home Teams

Penn State Nittany Lions football


1. LSU — Tiger Stadium

Tiger Stadium, affectionately known as the real Death Valley, is home to the LSU football team and is the third largest stadium in the SEC. Holding over 102,000 fans, it creates a wild atmosphere on gamedays. Tiger Stadium has the unique feature of marking yard lines every five yards, and previously had dorm rooms build into the structure. The stadium also features H style goal posts rather than the tradition Y-style. Death Valley also has two HD video boards that give fans an up-close look at all of the action. The stadium previously served as a temporary home for the New Orleans Saints following Hurricane Katrina.

Capacity

102,321

Attendance Record

102,321

Location

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Nickname

Death Valley

Date Opened

November 25, 1924

Home Teams

LSU Tigers football, New Orleans Saints (4 games in 2005), Tulane Green Wave football (1 game, 2005), and South Carolina Gamecocks football (1 game, 2015)